Special #1365

Moving for Bone Health

5 min - Special
64 likes
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Description

Rebekah Rotstein will inspire you to move to maintain the health of your bones. She speaks about how she felt when she was diagnosed with osteoporosis and what she learned as a result of that. Bone health begins during childhood so it doesn't matter if you are 5 or 65, you should be moving your body to keep it healthy. In just a few minutes, Rebekah will have you off your seat and ready to dance!

This was filmed at Balanced Body's Pilates On Tour in Los Angeles, California. You can find dates and locations of future events by going to the Pilates on Tour page.
What You'll Need: No props needed

About This Video

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(Pace N/A)
Feb 12, 2014
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Transcript

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When I was 28 I was diagnosed with osteoporosis. Good. Somebody so young have osteoporosis. You don't look like anything's wrong with you. No. I've been moving my whole life.

I began as an ice skater when I was three years old. That led me to classical ballet. I was a dancer. Okay? I've always loved to move, but when I was first diagnosed, I was so angry. I was anguished, I was frustrated.

I had always identified with my body since I was a child. This was who I was. And suddenly I felt like my body had deceived me. But what I discovered was that my body was working exactly as it was and exactly as it should. Nothing was going wrong. It's just that I hadn't been paying enough attention to it.

So I encourage you all to consider this. The health of your bones starts way earlier than you think. This is not an elderly issue. This is a childhood issue. You see, you start building your bone strength to Latte the rest of your life as a kid and it peaks as a teenager and it starts declining by the time you're 30 so now with the time for us to help the children in our lives to realize and understand, to take care of their bodies and to build and maintain the strongest bones that they can for the rest of their lives. And here is what you can do first, encourage the children in your life to eat healthy whole foods and snack. Make a ciliary and peanut butter with raisins snack or make a slimy green smoothie. Just don't tell them about the healthy kale inside, but these whole unprocessed foods and leafy Greens offer essential vitamins and minerals that are required for good bone growth.

Second, vitamin D, Did you know that 60% 60% of American children are estimated to have low and sub optimal levels of vitamin D and Vitamin D is required for calcium absorption to occur in the first place in your body. There's very few foods which offer it unless it's four to five. So get your kids outdoors in the sunlight or offer a supplementation if needed. But we have to make sure that they're having the vitamin D because it's essential again, for the strong, healthy bones. Next physical activity.

Woo. And get your kids moving. We can jump, we can skip, we can hop. We can move in ways that will stimulate bone growth. How about PyLadies? Got It. You know, I used to teach a woman on her at her home on Sunday mornings.

Every single Sunday we would be doing Palase and then one day her children as if they could join the party. And before we knew it, the whole family was participating because her husband was joining as well. So it was a time for family bonding. In addition to physical activity and bone stimulation. And this is important because your bones need to be stimulated through movement, through muscle activation. And as long as we're talking about movement, do you know that one of the most joyous activities and the best things that you can do for your bones is to dance.

So turn on the music yet on the, we pump up, what are the music? Did he go and shake your booty? [inaudible].

Comments

Hi. My sister was diagnosed with osteoporosis at 21. Although I believe that many of the things you mentioned to promote healthy bones were lacking in her life- it seems that you have always followed those principles in your life. Was it purely genetically inherited on your part?
Inspiring Rebekah!
Jeanine, like many young ballet dancers and high-performing competitive athletes, my menses stopped and my estrogen levels were low. I also had a vitamin D deficiency which we only discovered when I was later diagnosed with osteoporosis. And these are both high risk factors which should be looked at among others.
2 people like this.
Love it! Thank you for these five great minutes. I actually danced around in my kitchen!
Ros
1 person likes this.
Thanks, Rebekah & Pilates Anytime for bringing this important message to us.
Great message Rebekah! The nutrition is huge for many things. My friend was put on high dose Vitamin D3 from her doctor to correct for a severe deficiency and it made a huge difference.
Loved this !!! loved this !! did I say I loved this !!!

Great information for everyone !
1 person likes this.
Ok thanks Rebekah!
2 people like this.
My mother, who is 98, played basketball as a child, waterskied when older and took care of my dad when in her 70s. When she stopped performing those activities; that's when the osteoporosis accelerated. Comment: It's a challenge to motivate older clientele to "keep on moving" when various body-parts wear out. Thanks for the ear. John
Rebekah! you shine, I love this!!!!!! XX

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